ASHA Code of Ethics (2016) (2023)

Organization:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Source:

ASHA Code of Ethics

Date Approved:

March 1, 2016

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ASHA Code of Ethics

Code of EthicsEffective March 1, 2016

Table of Contents

Preamble

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA; hereafter, also known as "The Association") has been committed to a framework of common principles and standards of practice since ASHA's inception in 1925. This commitment was formalized in 1952 as the Association's first Code of Ethics. This Code has been modified and adapted as society and the professions have changed. The Code of Ethics reflects what we value as professionals and establishes expectations for our scientific and clinical practice based on principles of duty, accountability, fairness, and responsibility. The ASHA Code of Ethics is intended to ensure the welfare of the consumer and to protect the reputation and integrity of the professions.

The ASHA Code of Ethics is a framework and focused guide for professionals in support of day-to-day decision making related to professional conduct. The Code is partly obligatory and disciplinary and partly aspirational and descriptive in that it defines the professional's role. The Code educates professionals in the discipline, as well as students, other professionals, and the public, regarding ethical principles and standards that direct professional conduct.

The preservation of the highest standards of integrity and ethical principles is vital to the responsible discharge of obligations by audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists who serve as clinicians, educators, mentors, researchers, supervisors, and administrators. This Code of Ethics sets forth the fundamental principles and rules considered essential to this purpose and isapplicable to the following individuals:

  • a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association holding the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC)
  • a member of the Association not holding the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC)
  • a nonmember of the Association holding the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC)
  • an applicant for certification, or for membership and certification

By holding ASHA certification or membership, or through application for such, all individuals are automatically subject to the jurisdiction of the Board of Ethics for ethics complaint adjudication. Individuals who provide clinical services and who also desire membership in the Association must hold the CCC.

The fundamentals of ethical conduct are described by Principles of Ethics and by Rules of Ethics. The four Principles of Ethics form the underlying philosophical basis for the Code of Ethics and are reflected in the following areas: (I) responsibility to persons served professionally and to research participants, both human and animal; (II) responsibility for one's professional competence; (III) responsibility to the public; and (IV) responsibility for professional relationships. Individuals shall honor and abide by these Principles as affirmative obligations under all conditions of applicable professional activity. Rules of Ethics are specific statements of minimally acceptable as well as unacceptable professional conduct.

The Code is designed to provide guidance to members, applicants, and certified individuals as they make professional decisions. Because the Code is not intended to address specific situations and is not inclusive of all possible ethical dilemmas, professionals are expected to follow the written provisions and to uphold the spirit and purpose of the Code. Adherence to the Code of Ethics and its enforcement results in respect for the professions and positive outcomes for individuals who benefit from the work of audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists.

Terminology

ASHA Standards and Ethics

The mailing address for self-reporting in writing is American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Standards and Ethics, 2200 Research Blvd., #313, Rockville, MD 20850.

advertising

Any form of communication with the public about services, therapies, products, or publications.

conflict of interest

An opposition between the private interests and the official or professional responsibilities of a person in a position of trust, power, and/or authority.

crime

Any felony; or any misdemeanor involving dishonesty, physical harm to the person or property of another, or a threat of physical harm to the person or property of another. For more details, see the "Disclosure Information" section of applications for ASHA certification found onwww.asha.org/certification/AudCertification/andwww.asha.org/certification/SLPCertification/.

diminished decision-making ability

Any condition that renders a person unable to form the specific intent necessary to determine a reasonable course of action.

fraud

Any act, expression, omission, or concealment—the intent of which is either actual or constructive—calculated to deceive others to their disadvantage.

impaired practitioner

An individual whose professional practice is adversely affected by addiction, substance abuse, or health-related and/or mental health–related conditions.

individuals

Members and/or certificate holders, including applicants for certification.

informed consent

May be verbal, unless written consent is required; constitutes consent by persons served, research participants engaged, or parents and/or guardians of persons served to a proposed course of action after the communication of adequate information regarding expected outcomes and potential risks.

jurisdiction

The "personal jurisdiction" and authority of the ASHA Board of Ethics over an individual holding ASHA certification and/or membership, regardless of the individual's geographic location.

know, known, or knowingly

Having or reflecting knowledge.

may vs. shall

Maydenotes an allowance for discretion;shalldenotes no discretion.

misrepresentation

Any statement by words or other conduct that, under the circumstances, amounts to an assertion that is false or erroneous (i.e., not in accordance with the facts); any statement made with conscious ignorance or a reckless disregard for the truth.

negligence

Breaching of a duty owed to another, which occurs because of a failure to conform to a requirement, and this failure has caused harm to another individual, which led to damages to this person(s); failure to exercise the care toward others that a reasonable or prudent person would take in the circumstances, or taking actions that such a reasonable person would not.

nolo contendere

No contest.

(Video) Ethics ASHA CEUs CLD Issues in Speech Language Pathology

plagiarism

False representation of another person's idea, research, presentation, result, or product as one's own through irresponsible citation, attribution, or paraphrasing; ethical misconduct does not include honest error or differences of opinion.

publicly sanctioned

A formal disciplinary action of public record, excluding actions due to insufficient continuing education, checks returned for insufficient funds, or late payment of fees not resulting in unlicensed practice.

reasonable or reasonably

Supported or justified by fact or circumstance and being in accordance with reason, fairness, duty, or prudence.

self-report

A professional obligation of self-disclosure that requires (a) notifying ASHA Standards and Ethics and (b) mailing a hard copy of a certified document to ASHA Standards and Ethics (see term above). All self-reports are subject to a separate ASHA Certification review process, which, depending on the seriousness of the self-reported information, takes additional processing time.

shall vs. may

Shalldenotes no discretion;maydenotes an allowance for discretion.

support personnel

Those providing support to audiologists, speech-language pathologists, or speech, language, and hearing scientists (e.g., technician, paraprofessional, aide, or assistant in audiology, speech-language pathology, or communication sciences and disorders). For more information, read the Issues in Ethics Statements onAudiology Assistantsand/orSpeech-Language Pathology Assistants.

telepractice, teletherapy

Application of telecommunications technology to the delivery of audiology and speech-language pathology professional services at a distance by linking clinician to client/patient or clinician to clinician for assessment, intervention, and/or consultation. The quality of the service should be equivalent to in-person service. For more information,see the telepractice sectionon the ASHA Practice Portal.

written

Encompasses both electronic and hard-copy writings or communications.

Principle of Ethics I

Individuals shall honor their responsibility to hold paramount the welfare of persons they serve professionally or who are participants in research and scholarly activities, and they shall treat animals involved in research in a humane manner.

Rules of Ethics

  1. Individuals shall provide all clinical services and scientific activities competently.

  2. Individuals shall use every resource, including referral and/or interprofessional collaboration when appropriate, to ensure that quality service is provided.

  3. Individuals shall not discriminate in the delivery of professional services or in the conduct of research and scholarly activities on the basis of race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity/gender expression, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, disability, culture, language, or dialect.

  4. Individuals shall not misrepresent the credentials of aides, assistants, technicians, support personnel, students, research interns, Clinical Fellows, or any others under their supervision, and they shall inform those they serve professionally of the name, role, and professional credentials of persons providing services.

  5. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence may delegate tasks related to the provision of clinical services to aides, assistants, technicians, support personnel, or any other persons only if those persons are adequately prepared and are appropriately supervised. The responsibility for the welfare of those being served remains with the certified individual.

  6. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence shall not delegate tasks that require the unique skills, knowledge, judgment, or credentials that are within the scope of their profession to aides, assistants, technicians, support personnel, or any nonprofessionals over whom they have supervisory responsibility.

  7. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence may delegate to students tasks related to the provision of clinical services that require the unique skills, knowledge, and judgment that are within the scope of practice of their profession only if those students are adequately prepared and are appropriately supervised. The responsibility for the welfare of those being served remains with the certified individual.

  8. Individuals shall obtain informed consent from the persons they serve about the nature and possible risks and effects of services provided, technology employed, and products dispensed. This obligation also includes informing persons served about possible effects of not engaging in treatment or not following clinical recommendations. If diminished decision-making ability of persons served is suspected, individuals should seek appropriate authorization for services, such as authorization from a spouse, other family member, or legally authorized/appointed representative.

  9. Individuals shall enroll and include persons as participants in research or teaching demonstrations only if participation is voluntary, without coercion, and with informed consent.

  10. Individuals shall accurately represent the intended purpose of a service, product, or research endeavor and shall abide by established guidelines for clinical practice and the responsible conduct of research.

  11. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence shall evaluate the effectiveness of services provided, technology employed, and products dispensed, and they shall provide services or dispense products only when benefit can reasonably be expected.

  12. Individuals may make a reasonable statement of prognosis, but they shall not guarantee—directly or by implication—the results of any treatment or procedure.

  13. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence shall use independent and evidence-based clinical judgment, keeping paramount the best interests of those being served.

  14. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence shall not provide clinical services solely by correspondence, but may provide services via telepractice consistent with professional standards and state and federal regulations.

  15. Individuals shall protect the confidentiality and security of records of professional services provided, research and scholarly activities conducted, and products dispensed. Access to these records shall be allowed only when doing so is necessary to protect the welfare of the person or of the community, is legally authorized, or is otherwise required by law.

    (Video) Client confidentiality and ethical behavior

  16. Individuals shall protect the confidentiality of any professional or personal information about persons served professionally or participants involved in research and scholarly activities and may disclose confidential information only when doing so is necessary to protect the welfare of the person or of the community, is legally authorized, or is otherwise required by law.

  17. Individuals shall maintain timely records and accurately record and bill for services provided and products dispensed and shall not misrepresent services provided, products dispensed, or research and scholarly activities conducted.

  18. Individuals whose professional practice is adversely affected by substance abuse, addiction, or other health-related conditions are impaired practitioners and shall seek professional assistance and, where appropriate, withdraw from the affected areas of practice.

  19. Individuals who have knowledge that a colleague is unable to provide professional services with reasonable skill and safety shall report this information to the appropriate authority, internally if a mechanism exists and, otherwise, externally.

  20. Individuals shall provide reasonable notice and information about alternatives for obtaining care in the event that they can no longer provide professional services.

Principle of Ethics II

Individuals shall honor their responsibility to achieve and maintain the highest level of professional competence and performance.

Rules of Ethics

  1. Individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence shall engage in only those aspects of the professions that are within the scope of their professional practice and competence, considering their certification status, education, training, and experience.

  2. Members who do not hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence may not engage in the provision of clinical services; however, individuals who are in the certification application process may engage in the provision of clinical services consistent with current local and state laws and regulations and with ASHA certification requirements.

  3. Individuals who engage in research shall comply with all institutional, state, and federal regulations that address any aspects of research, including those that involve human participants and animals.

  4. Individuals shall enhance and refine their professional competence and expertise through engagement in lifelong learning applicable to their professional activities and skills.

  5. Individuals in administrative or supervisory roles shall not require or permit their professional staff to provide services or conduct research activities that exceed the staff member's certification status, competence, education, training, and experience.

  6. Individuals in administrative or supervisory roles shall not require or permit their professional staff to provide services or conduct clinical activities that compromise the staff member's independent and objective professional judgment.

  7. Individuals shall make use of technology and instrumentation consistent with accepted professional guidelines in their areas of practice. When such technology is not available, an appropriate referral may be made.

  8. Individuals shall ensure that all technology and instrumentation used to provide services or to conduct research and scholarly activities are in proper working order and are properly calibrated.

Principle of Ethics III

Individuals shall honor their responsibility to the public when advocating for the unmet communication and swallowing needs of the public and shall provide accurate information involving any aspect of the professions.

Rules of Ethics

  1. Individuals shall not misrepresent their credentials, competence, education, training, experience, and scholarly contributions.

  2. Individuals shall avoid engaging in conflicts of interest whereby personal, financial, or other considerations have the potential to influence or compromise professional judgment and objectivity.

  3. Individuals shall not misrepresent research and scholarly activities, diagnostic information, services provided, results of services provided, products dispensed, or the effects of products dispensed.

  4. Individuals shall not defraud through intent, ignorance, or negligence or engage in any scheme to defraud in connection with obtaining payment, reimbursement, or grants and contracts for services provided, research conducted, or products dispensed.

  5. Individuals' statements to the public shall provide accurate and complete information about the nature and management of communication disorders, about the professions, about professional services, about products for sale, and about research and scholarly activities.

  6. Individuals' statements to the public shall adhere to prevailing professional norms and shall not contain misrepresentations when advertising, announcing, and promoting their professional services and products and when reporting research results.

  7. Individuals shall not knowingly make false financial or nonfinancial statements and shall complete all materials honestly and without omission.

    (Video) CEU: Ethical Decision-Making in the Current Practice Environment

Principle of Ethics IV

Individuals shall uphold the dignity and autonomy of the professions, maintain collaborative and harmonious interprofessional and intraprofessional relationships, and accept the professions' self-imposed standards.

Rules of Ethics

  1. Individuals shall work collaboratively, when appropriate, with members of one's own profession and/or members of other professions to deliver the highest quality of care.

  2. Individuals shall exercise independent professional judgment in recommending and providing professional services when an administrative mandate, referral source, or prescription prevents keeping the welfare of persons served paramount.

  3. Individuals' statements to colleagues about professional services, research results, and products shall adhere to prevailing professional standards and shall contain no misrepresentations.

  4. Individuals shall not engage in any form of conduct that adversely reflects on the professions or on the individual's fitness to serve persons professionally.

  5. Individuals shall not engage in dishonesty, negligence, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation.

  6. Applicants for certification or membership, and individuals making disclosures, shall not knowingly make false statements and shall complete all application and disclosure materials honestly and without omission.

  7. Individuals shall not engage in any form of harassment, power abuse, or sexual harassment.

  8. Individuals shall not engage in sexual activities with individuals (other than a spouse or other individual with whom a prior consensual relationship exists) over whom they exercise professional authority or power, including persons receiving services, assistants, students, or research participants.

  9. Individuals shall not knowingly allow anyone under their supervision to engage in any practice that violates the Code of Ethics.

  10. Individuals shall assign credit only to those who have contributed to a publication, presentation, process, or product. Credit shall be assigned in proportion to the contribution and only with the contributor's consent.

  11. Individuals shall reference the source when using other persons' ideas, research, presentations, results, or products in written, oral, or any other media presentation or summary. To do otherwise constitutes plagiarism.

  12. Individuals shall not discriminate in their relationships with colleagues, assistants, students, support personnel, and members of other professions and disciplines on the basis of race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity/gender expression, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, disability, culture, language, dialect, or socioeconomic status.

  13. Individuals with evidence that the Code of Ethics may have been violated have the responsibility to work collaboratively to resolve the situation where possible or to inform the Board of Ethics through its established procedures.

  14. Individuals shall report members of other professions who they know have violated standards of care to the appropriate professional licensing authority or board, other professional regulatory body, or professional association when such violation compromises the welfare of persons served and/or research participants.

  15. Individuals shall not file or encourage others to file complaints that disregard or ignore facts that would disprove the allegation; the Code of Ethics shall not be used for personal reprisal, as a means of addressing personal animosity, or as a vehicle for retaliation.

  16. Individuals making and responding to complaints shall comply fully with the policies of the Board of Ethics in its consideration, adjudication, and resolution of complaints of alleged violations of the Code of Ethics.

  17. Individuals involved in ethics complaints shall not knowingly make false statements of fact or withhold relevant facts necessary to fairly adjudicate the complaints.

  18. Individuals shall comply with local, state, and federal laws and regulations applicable to professional practice, research ethics, and the responsible conduct of research.

  19. Individuals who have been convicted; been found guilty; or entered a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to (1) any misdemeanor involving dishonesty, physical harm—or the threat of physical harm—to the person or property of another, or (2) any felony, shall self-report by notifying ASHA Standards and Ethics (see Terminology for mailing address) in writing within 30 days of the conviction, plea, or finding of guilt. Individuals shall also provide a certified copy of the conviction, plea, nolo contendere record, or docket entry to ASHA Standards and Ethics within 30 days of self-reporting.

  20. Individuals who have been publicly sanctioned or denied a license or a professional credential by any professional association, professional licensing authority or board, or other professional regulatory body shall self-report by notifying ASHA Standards and Ethics (see Terminology for mailing address) in writing within 30 days of the final action or disposition. Individuals shall also provide a certified copy of the final action, sanction, or disposition to ASHA Standards and Ethics within 30 days of self-reporting.

(Video) ASHA Ethics - Principals 2G, 1R, & 1P

Year Published:

FAQs

What is the code of ethics Asha? ›

The ASHA Code of Ethics is a framework and focused guide for professionals in support of day-to-day decision making related to professional conduct. The Code is partly obligatory and disciplinary and partly aspirational and descriptive in that it defines the professional's role.

What are the 7 codes of ethics? ›

Seven golden ethical principles:
  • Be an ethical leader.
  • Use moral courage.
  • Consider personal and professional reputation.
  • Set the right tone at the top.
  • Maintain an enquiring mindset.
  • Consider the public interest.
  • Consider 'the right, the good and the virtuous' actions"
20 Feb 2019

What are the four principles of code of ethics? ›

The 4 basic ethical principles that apply to forensic activities are respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice.

How many principles are included in the Asha code of ethics? ›

The four Principles of Ethics form the underlying philosophical basis for the Code of Ethics and are reflected in the following areas: (I) responsibility to persons served professionally and to research participants, both human and animal; (II) responsibility for one's professional competence; (III) responsibility to ...

What are the 3 major sections of the Code of Ethics? ›

The Code of Ethics is divided into three major sections, "Duties to Clients and Customers," "Duties to the Public," and "Duties to REALTORS."

What are the 6 types of ethics? ›

The principles are beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, justice; truth-telling and promise-keeping.

What are ASHA C's? ›

Introduction. The Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC) is a semi-autonomous credentialing body of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Why is ASHA Code of Ethics important? ›

The importance of adherence to the Code of Ethics by ASHA members lies in the preservation of the highest standards of integrity and ethical principles. It is vital to ensure the responsible discharge of obligations by members of our profession working in all settings.

What are the 6 elements that must be in place to support a Code of Ethics in any company? ›

Get started writing your policy with these six key things to include in your code of ethics.
...
6 Essential Things to Include in Your Company's Code of Ethics
  • Message from the CEO/Founder. ...
  • Purpose and Scope. ...
  • Core Values or Ethical Standards. ...
  • How to Report a Concern. ...
  • Ethical Decision-Making. ...
  • Ethics and Compliance Relationship.
3 Mar 2021

What are the 3 types of codes? ›

The Three Types of Code
  • Boring Code. Boring code is when it makes perfect sense when you read it. ...
  • Salt Mine Code. This is the type of code that's bonkers and makes not a lick of sense. ...
  • Radioactive Code. Radioactive code is the real problem at the heart of every engineering team.
3 Feb 2020

What are ethical codes examples? ›

Be honest and trustworthy. Be fair and take action not to discriminate. Honor confidentiality. Perform work only in areas of competence

What are some examples of code of ethics? ›

Personal code of ethics examples
  • I will treat others as I wish to be treated. ...
  • I will be honest and transparent in my personal and professional life. ...
  • I will always put forth my best effort, and I will maintain a healthy work-life balance. ...
  • I am dedicated to continually improving myself.

What is the golden rule in the code of ethics? ›

The most familiar version of the Golden Rule says, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” Moral philosophy has barely taken notice of the golden rule in its own terms despite the rule's prominence in commonsense ethics.

What are the 8 principles of ethics? ›

This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements.

What are the 2 types of ethics? ›

There are two main types of ethical inquiry: Theoretical ethics and applied ethics. Theoretical ethics is concerned with understanding the nature of ethics, ethical language and ethical reasoning.

What is the big 9 SLP? ›

The big-nine areas are articulation, fluency, voice and resonance, language, cognition, hearing, swallowing, social communication, and communication modalities.

What does CCC stand for in ASHA? ›

General Information About ASHA Certification

Being "certified" means holding the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC), a nationally recognized professional credential that represents a level of excellence in the field of Audiology (CCC-A) or Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP).

What is a CF in SLP? ›

About the Clinical Fellowship (CF)

The SLP standards must be adhered to in order to be eligible to earn the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP). The SLP CF is a mentored professional experience that begins after the completion of academic course work and clinical practicum.

What is the main purpose of the Code of Ethics in Healthcare? ›

The purpose of the Code of Ethics of the American College of Healthcare Executives is to serve as a standard of conduct for members. It contains standards of ethical behavior for healthcare executives in their professional relationships.

Who does the ASHA Code of Ethics apply to? ›

The Assistants Code of Conduct ("Code of Conduct") applies to ASHA-certified audiology assistants and speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs).

What is the purpose of a Code of Ethics to employees? ›

A code encourages discussions of ethics and compliance, empowering employees to handle ethical dilemmas they encounter in everyday work. It can also serve as a valuable reference, helping employees locate relevant documents, services and other resources related to ethics within the organization.

Why is ASHA code of ethics important? ›

The importance of adherence to the Code of Ethics by ASHA members lies in the preservation of the highest standards of integrity and ethical principles. It is vital to ensure the responsible discharge of obligations by members of our profession working in all settings.

What are the social workers code of ethics? ›

Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person. Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients' socially responsible self-determination.

What are the Code of Ethics for professional Teachers? ›

Teachers must model strong character traits, including perseverance, honesty, respect, lawfulness, fairness, patience, and unity. As an educator, teachers must treat every student with kindness and respect without showing any favoritism, prejudice or partiality.

What are examples of code of ethics? ›

Personal code of ethics examples
  • I will treat others as I wish to be treated. ...
  • I will be honest and transparent in my personal and professional life. ...
  • I will always put forth my best effort, and I will maintain a healthy work-life balance. ...
  • I am dedicated to continually improving myself.

What is the main purpose of the Code of Ethics in Healthcare? ›

The purpose of the Code of Ethics of the American College of Healthcare Executives is to serve as a standard of conduct for members. It contains standards of ethical behavior for healthcare executives in their professional relationships.

Who does the ASHA Code of Ethics apply to? ›

The Assistants Code of Conduct ("Code of Conduct") applies to ASHA-certified audiology assistants and speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs).

What are ASHA C's? ›

Introduction. The Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC) is a semi-autonomous credentialing body of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

What are the 4 goals of social work? ›

Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. Develop Liberatory Consciousness.

What are the 3 social work practices? ›

Social workers perform their roles and responsibilities within three interrelated levels of practice: micro, mezzo, and macro. These systems of practice use different methodologies to provide services to diverse populations, but they all operate within the Person-in-Environment (PIE) Theory.

What is Article 7 of code of ethics for professional teachers? ›

Section 7. Every teacher shall maintain harmonious and pleasant personal and official relations with other professionals, with government officials, and with the people, individually or collectively.

What is Article 4 in code of ethics for professional teachers? ›

Article IV: A Teacher and the Profession Section 1. Every teacher shall actively insure that teaching is the noblest profession, and shall manifest genuine enthusiasm and pride in teaching as a noble calling.

What are the 4 areas of teacher professionalism? ›

Danielson divides the complex activity of teaching into twenty-two components clustered into four domains of teaching responsibility: (1) planning and preparation, (2) the classroom environment, (3) instruction, and (4) professional responsibilities. These domains and their components are outlined in a following table.

What are the two types of codes of ethics? ›

There are two main types of codes of ethics. The short code of ethics such as the IEEE Code of Ethics and the longer code of ethics such as the NSPE Code of Ethics. The shorter codes are meant to be a general framework that guides the professional of the society towards certain ethical goals and responsibilities.

Why is code of ethics important? ›

A code encourages discussions of ethics and compliance, empowering employees to handle ethical dilemmas they encounter in everyday work. It can also serve as a valuable reference, helping employees locate relevant documents, services and other resources related to ethics within the organization.

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